Interdisciplinary Lunchtime Seminar

The Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

2019-12-10 12:00:002019-12-10 13:00:00Asia/Hong_KongThe Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

Interdisciplinary Lunchtime Seminar
The Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

Dr. Xu Jing
(Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington)

Date: December 10, 2019 (Tuesday)
Time: 12:00 – 13:00
Venue: Room 201, 2/F, May Hall, The University of Hong Kong
Enquiry: (852) 3917-5772, ihss@hku.hk

    2019-12-10 12:00:002019-12-10 13:00:00Asia/Hong_KongThe Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

    Interdisciplinary Lunchtime Seminar
    The Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

    Dr. Xu Jing
    (Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington)

    Date: December 10, 2019 (Tuesday)
    Time: 12:00 – 13:00
    Venue: Room 201, 2/F, May Hall, The University of Hong Kong
    Enquiry: (852) 3917-5772, ihss@hku.hk

      Overview

      Title:

      The Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

      Speaker:

      Dr. Xu Jing (Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington)

      Date:

      December 10, 2019

      Time:

      12:00 nn – 1:00 pm

      Venue:

      Room 201, 2/F, May Hall, The University of Hong Kong (Map)

      Language:

      English

      Enquiry:

      (Tel) (852) 3917-5772
      (Email) ihss@hku.hk

      Title:

      The Mischievous, the Naughty, and the Violent in a Taiwanese Village: Peer Aggression Narratives in Arthur P. Wolf’s “Child Interview” (1959)

      Speaker:

      Dr. Xu Jing (Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington)

      Date:

      December 10, 2019

      Time:

      12:00 nn – 1:00 pm

      Venue:

      Room 201, 2/F, May Hall, The University of Hong Kong (Map)

      Language:

      English

      Enquiry:

      (Tel) (852) 3917-5772
      (Email) ihss@hku.hk

      Abstract

      This talk is based on a unique, new project that aims at bringing to light the late anthropologist Arthur P. Wolf’s unpublished research on children and childrearing in Taiwan, conducted in 1958 – 1960. Designed as an improved replication of the Six Cultures Study, a landmark project in the anthropology of children and childhood, Wolf’s work was the first anthropological and mixed-methods research on ethnic Chinese children. Drawing from standardized interviews with 79 children (ages 3 – 10), this talk focuses on children’s narratives about peer aggression scenarios. Children’s narratives reveal a complex spectrum of reciprocity in their own understandings about peer aggression, their perceptions and reactions reflecting important concerns and strategies in local socio-moral life. Taken together, these findings add an important theme, “negative reciprocity” — defined as responding to a negative action with a negative action, to the recent advocacy in anthropology for taking children seriously in understanding human morality. Moreover, these peer aggression narratives illuminate a dark side of childhood experience that would otherwise remain obscured in the historical literature, therefore contribute to bridging anthropological and historical studies of childhood.

      About the Speaker

      Dr. Xu Jing is a cultural anthropologist at the Department of Anthropology, University of Washington. Her research explores these central questions: How do we become moral beings? How do children acquire morality in cultural contexts? How do cultural and psychological processes intersect to shape the transmission and transformations of socio-moral norms? Focusing on Mainland China, Taiwan, as well as cross-cultural comparative contexts, her research brings an interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture, morality, education, and child development. Jing holds a doctoral degree from Washington University in St. Louis, got her B.A. and M.A. from Tsinghua University, Beijing, and received postdoctoral training in psychology from the University of Washington. She is the author of The Good Child: Moral Development in a Chinese Preschool (Stanford University Press, 2017). She has published peer-reviewed articles in American Anthropologist, Ethos, Developmental Psychology, PLoS One.

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